Print Page | Contact Us | Sign In | Join CANA Today!
The Cremation Logs
Blog Home All Blogs
The Cremation Logs, CANA's Blog for Cremation Professionals

Cremation experts share the latest news, trends, and creative advice for industry professionals. Register or log in to subscribe and stay engaged with all things cremation.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: tips and tools  consumers  events  arranging  public relations  services  education  memorialization  marketing  processes and procedures  hr  personalization  professional development  storytelling  business planning  statistics  preplanning  aftercare  cemetery  history  leadership  safety  celebrants  manufacturers  covid19  pets  alkaline hydrolysis  body preparation  embalming  green practices 

Hungry for Growth: Creating a Thriving Cremation Brand

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 9, 2020
Hungry for Growth: Creating a Thriving Cremation Brand

 

In March 2018, Chick-fil-A opened its largest restaurant in its history on Fulton Street in Lower Manhattan. Chick-fil-A fans showed up in droves with a line stretching down a full city block.

This wasn’t an isolated incident. All over the country, at various times throughout the year, campers huddle in tents overnight to be one of the first customers at one of a multitude of Chick-fil-A’s Grand Openings, with the first 100 customers receiving free Chick-fil-A for a year. As the New York Post said, “Chick-fil-A is on fire. The fastest growing chicken-sandwich franchise is poised to become the third-largest fast-food chain in the country in 2019, replacing Subway, according to Kalinowski Equity Research.”

With all of the fast-food choices in the world, Chick-fil-A has created a brand that people not only recognize but connect with on an emotional level. So, what is it that differentiates Chick-fil-A from all other fast-food restaurants and what can this restaurant chain teach us about branding in the cremation industry?

When analyzing the funeral industry, and particularly the cremation space, what business similarities do most cremation providers have? They all offer caskets, urns, flowers, GPLs, and standardized practices. Unfortunately, there are far too few differentiating characteristics within cremation service providers. The challenge of all businesses, but especially in businesses that have common product and service offerings, is how to distinguish themselves from the competition.

When considering the success of Chick-fil-A, it is important to ask what it is that differentiates its brand amongst their competitors. Here’s a test: see how quickly you can answer these questions:

  1. What is the color of the Chick-fil-A logo, and what animal is hidden in the letter “C”?
  2. What is Chick-fil-A’s tagline and what mascot delivers the tagline?
  3. What is it every Chick-fil-A employee says when you say, “Thank you”?

As a consumer, you should have quickly been able to identify the red logo with a chicken hidden in the letter “C.” In addition, the cow has been campaigning for you to “Eat Mor Chikin” since 1995. And last, “It’s my pleasure” is the simple line that uniquely positions Chick-fil-A in its delivery of exceptional service. All three of these differentiating factors help establish the company’s brand and identity. The company has clearly defined a distinct image, message, and brand.

With this example in mind, what are some ways a cremation service provider can distinguish itself in the cremation space and begin creating a unique brand image? Ultimately, it comes down to superior branding, in addition to the unwavering quality of service. Following are strategies you can incorporate to create a thriving brand with a distinct identity in a competitive market.

Establish a Brand Ambassador that Puts Service Above All Else

More than just the Chick-fil-A cow mascot, it is the people that truly make your experience at Chick-fil-A a memorable one. They play a vital role in differentiating Chick-fil-A by going the extra mile to clean up your table when you are done eating, taking your order before you even reach the drive-through menu, or simply handing you a card for a free sandwich when they make a mistake. Creating brand ambassadors by providing exceptional customer service is what differentiates Chick-fil-A from all other fast-food restaurants. Who differentiates you or your firm in the market place?

Speaking with hundreds of firms around the country, most of them feel they do a “good job” at getting out into the community and representing their firm. However, we live in an at-need world, and, when the phone rings or when we are on coroner rotation, we have to go and serve.

Many times, the constant pressures of the at-need business pull us away from opportunities to further the brand. This is known as working in the business and not on the business. To combat this, you must dedicate time to get out into the community and represent your brand.

In some firms, the owner takes on this responsibility. In others, it may be shared by a couple of individuals. Whomever you choose as your brand ambassador, it is important that someone is visiting the hospice centers and the nursing facilities, attending community functions, etc.—someone who will become the face and voice of the firm. This means not only being a recognizable face in these places, but being the face of a firm that cares, provides exceptional service, and sacrificially gives back to the community. Over time, your firm will become known as part of the fabric of the community. You will see your brand grow because people will know they can trust you and the brand you represent.

The following story within the cremation space demonstrates the absolute necessity of having a brand ambassador. A little over ten years ago, a recent college graduate had an idea for entering the cremation market in the Pacific Northwest. He found a location to start his business and began to hustle. He attended every chamber of commerce function he could. He met all the hospice organizations, and he got to know the officers and deputies of the local police department and sheriff ’s office.

Everywhere he went, he carried a few packages of peanut M&Ms in his pockets. As he would visit with people, he would give them a package of M&Ms. He became known as “The Candy Man.” Because he dedicated the time and hard work to develop the relationships, this young entrepreneur grew his brand from serving zero families to over 1,800 families per year, and the brand is still growing.

Be proud of who you are, and get out to tell your story. Be a dedicated brand ambassador who cares for people and offers them a unique experience that puts service and care for others above all else.

Create a Brand Promise that Differentiates Your Firm

What kind of promise do you think Chick-fil-A offers? As a customer, it is fairly easy to define. They promise to deliver higher quality fast food with exceptional customer service. The consumer understands they are not getting the cheapest fast food, but they are receiving a great value for their money.

How do you define your firm? What drives your business and the services you provide? What makes you unique and separates you from other firms? If you have not asked these questions about your business, you will not be able to differentiate your brand from the many other cremation options in the market.

An effective brand promise goes beyond the rational benefits of a product or service and strives to capture the emotional rewards that your firm can uniquely deliver. It is not a slogan or a headline, but a way of describing the commitment you are making to your customer base as to the type of experience they are going to have with your brand. In addition, a brand promise gives you a tremendous opportunity to create differentiation and excitement around your services and offerings.

The challenge with creating a brand promise is keeping it. You can print all the grandiose words you want about your brand; however, those words are empty if not delivered upon. A firm that continues to disappoint on its brand promise will begin to develop a much different brand reputation—one that will be difficult to recover from. Kept promises will define your brand. Here are three “must-dos” for your brand promise:

  1. A brand promise must create unique and compelling emotional benefits to using your firm.
  2. A brand promise must be genuine and attainable.
  3. A brand promise must be kept, every time.

Embrace and Implement Digital Marketing

Our world is busy. Coupled with this, the transient nature of families makes it more and more difficult to maintain significant, long-term brand communication with our customer base. Consumers today are arriving at firms with information they feel makes them well informed on funeral-related issues. Unless you are at the top of the search engine listing and have the highest reviews, the likelihood of you receiving the call from a son who lives five states away for his mother who just passed away in the care facility a few blocks away is nearly impossible.

Digital marketing is equally—if not more—important than all other marketing, advertising, and outreach activities. Digital marketing helps capture the calls that will never come through the telephone. The firms who understand and adapt quickly will flourish in the future economy. Death care is not immune to the shift in how consumers select and make purchases, so it is imperative to seek out industry experts to help drive your digital marketing strategy.

There is probably nothing simpler than a Chick-fil-A chicken sandwich, waffle fries, and fresh-squeezed lemonade, but the company has earned the loyalty and trust of millions of customers across the country. The way Chick-fil-A gained our business in the beginning required countless attempts through advertising, tireless delivery on a promise of quality, and consistency. The concepts of developing a brand are simple but not always easy to execute. By developing a brand ambassador, your firm will become the go-to firm for cremation needs.


Creating a brand promise that differentiates your firm will establish you as a business that truly cares for families. Aligning your brand pricing with your promise will create value in your offerings, and families will come back again and again. Finally, by implementing a digital marketing strategy, you will reach more families in your market that you knew existed.

These are simple strategies, but they are not easy. If you implement them, you will differentiate your firm and will help it thrive in the industry, and over time you will be a leading cremation service provider no longer hungry for growth but leading the way in serving families.

 


This post is excerpted from The Cremationist, Vol 55, Issue 3: Hungry for Growth: What a Chicken Sandwich Can Teach Us About Creating a Thriving Cremation Brand” by Jason Widing. Members can read this article and much more in The Cremationist archive. Not a member? Consider joining your business to access this and all archives of The Cremationist plus the many resources referenced here to help you find solutions for all aspects of your business – only $495.



Jason Widing Jason Widing is Vice President of Business Development for Foundation Partners Group. He has more than 15 years of business development experience in the funeral services industry. Prior to joining Foundation Partners, Widing was Senior Director of Business Development for PRECOA where he was responsible for driving and delivering new business objectives through strategic partnerships.

Tags:  business planning  public relations  services 

Share |
Permalink
 

The Definitive Millennials-in-the-Workplace Post

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, March 18, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, March 17, 2020
Event Tips and Trends for Funeral Service

 

CANA was proud to welcome the Millennial Directors, Zach Carnley and Matthew Morian, to the CANA stage at the 2019 Cremation Symposium. With Glenda Stansbury representing the Baby Boomers, this panel talked about our changing workforce and generations working together. They discussed navigating culture clashes, learning new ways of communicating (both language and mode), and the kinds of experiences one should have to earn their spot on the team.

After leaving Las Vegas, the Millennial Directors weren’t done. In the past few years, they’ve spoken about their experience on many associations’ stages. We asked them to write a definitive millennials-in-the-workplace post, putting the topic to bed. After all, they're here, they're in their thirties, —and what are employers’ other options, really? As we examine the millennial experience in the workplace—their search for a suitable work environment and their growth and leadership goals—we hope this post can both inform older generations of readers, and also encourage the younger generations to keep working to find their place in funeral service.


I have been fortunate enough in my career as a funeral professional to be involved in many different wonderful organizations. Credit goes to each of my employers who gave me the opportunity to have a voice and to speak on a topic that is near and dear to my heart. We all know that millennials are the bulk of our profession and steadily becoming the bulk of the families we serve. With that said, I have spoken in front of a few organizations on the best way to work together and blend generations to make the business more productive. During many of these presentations, I have asked for audience participation—and participate they did!

The Perception

Most everyone—millennials included—has quite a few thoughts on how they should work and the tasks they are given. I have heard everything from, “Millennials are extremely lazy, spending all day on their phone,” to “They are the most goal-oriented, outside-of-the-box thinking and solution-solving generation out there.” Most people I talked to would rather have a dedicated, creative millennial than a traditionalist because, for the most part, they are thinking of ways to better themselves and your business. True, some are there to put in only the bare minimum of what is requested, but you will find that all across the board.

In my presentations, I focus on the expectations millennials have of their employers: a fair schedule, decent pay, typical perks such as insurance and retirement, and room to introduce new ideas. I also speak on how we must focus our efforts as leaders to hone in on what they bring to the table and simply not make them “pay their dues.”

The Solution

As I said, I have been given almost carte blanche with most of my employers to focus on finding ways to better serve families. That is the attitude leaders need to have towards their millennial employees. Obviously, it’s the leader’s job to make sure these ideas are carried out efficiently with respect to the business. I have always considered it a blessing to get to travel around and be involved in numerous organizations and to socialize and learn from people who have been out there doing it. I hope to keep this up, because I always want to be up to speed on the latest our profession has to offer, both for the business I serve and, of course, the families I serve.

I wish many more employers would jump on board with this thought process. You must give your employees the opportunity to spread their wings and attend conventions, conferences, and educational seminars. They will learn so much more from other funeral professionals, things that they can bring back and put directly into action. The reality of it is there are so many scholarships out there that most people can attend these events at little cost. It’s is our job as leaders to send our people to these events and help them grow as professionals, which in turn will help you to grow your business.

- Zach Carnley

Company Culture

If you are wondering how to attract millennials to your business, then you have to ask yourself, “What do they really want?” I believe what millennials yearn for most in our profession is a healthy work environment. They desire a workplace that has strong leadership, a flexible schedule, and a solid company culture.

Mission-Driven

Company culture should be a top priority for any funeral home. Whether you are a family owned firm or part of a large corporation, it is important for your coworkers to know why you do what you do. A company’s culture is often made up of three key components: their values, their mission, and their vision.

A company’s vision is essentially their long term goal as a business. It will not typically change overtime as it should be something you continuously strive to achieve. Your mission is what you do every day to help attain your company vision. It is what defines your enterprise to the world. Your values are then an outline of the intended character of your coworkers. If an employee lives by the values you set forth then they are carrying out your mission and will ultimately fulfill your vision. A funeral home with a solid company culture is one with a future in which millennials can see themselves being an integral part of.

Flexible

Having a flexible schedule is another trait of a healthy work environment. A flexible schedule in our industry is a difficult task to tackle. To attempt to detail it would require an additional blog post. Simply stated: a flexible schedule allows for a work-life balance that decreases the likelihood of employee burnout over time.

For millennials, it may mean the ability to go their child’s tee-ball game or to go to a concert during their normal shift. Without tipping the scales too far for any one person, a leader should do their best to accommodate their colleagues instead of making it more difficult for them to find that balance. The results will be better morale and a willingness to go the extra mile for the company because the company went the extra mile for them.

Strong Leaders

In order to maintain a flexible schedule and support a company culture, you have to have strong leaders. Leaders do not have to be managers or supervisors. Those titles can be bestowed and stripped away without any discernible change occurring. A leader is one who cares for and supports those around them. They help others succeed and become the best they can be for the sake of the company, not for themselves.

Luckily, leadership can be learned! It is a skill that can be honed with practice. If you have the heart to serve (you’d hope so, working at a funeral home) then you have what it takes to lead. Set a good example with your actions. Set an even better example through your interactions with your coworkers. Stay positive and motivate others to do the same and you’ll see a healthy work environment begin to flourish.

With that, you’ll have an inbox full of resumes from millennials in no time.

- Matthew Morian

 


You can listen to the full panel in "Professor B and the Y-Men: Mentoring the Next Generation of Heroes" with Glenda Stansbury & Zach Carnley, and Matt Morian from CANA's 2019 Cremation Symposium, and our other presenters, for just $100. Visit goCANA.org/CANAheroes to learn more.



Zachary Carnley

Zach Carnley graduated from Stephen F. Austin State University with a B.A. in Criminal Justice. While attending SFA he worked part-time in a funeral home and discovered his passion for working with families at one of their toughest times. He decided to pursue this passion and graduated as valedictorian from the Dallas Institute of Funeral Service in 2009. Zach is a board member of the Academy of Professional Funeral Service Practice, a board member of the Texas Funeral Service Association and North Texas Funeral Director Association. He is a member of the Burleson Rotary Club and the Burleson Lions Club and serves as an ambassador with the Burleson Chamber of Commerce. Zach has been honored as both the North Texas Funeral Director Association’s and Texas Funeral Director Association’s Young Funeral Professional of the Year..

Matthew Morian

Matthew Morian is a first-generation funeral director & embalmer. He is the managing funeral director of Lucas Funeral Homes in Keller and Grapevine, Texas. Matt has been in the funeral profession since 2010 and is a graduate of the Dallas Institute of Funeral Service. He is a member of the Pi Sigma Eta funeral director’s fraternity and helped charter the Dallas Institute of Funeral Service’s Lions Club. Matt has served as President of the Dallas Institute’s Lions Club and the Keller Lions Club and as a Zone-Chairperson for Lions Club District 2-E2. In 2017, he was awarded the Texas Funeral Director Association’s Young Funeral Professional of the Year and he currently serves on the board of the North Texas Funeral Director Association.

Tags:  business planning  hr  professional development 

Share |
Permalink
 

Business Planning for Outbreak

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, March 4, 2020
Updated: Friday, July 31, 2020
Business Planning for Outbreak

 

At the end of February, CANA hosted our annual Cremation Symposium in Las Vegas. That’s right, we encouraged people to travel to meet up with more than one hundred people and network in a popular tourist destination — it was a different time. Unsurprisingly, the topic of discussion on the floor was the coronavirus pandemic, or the spread of COVID-19.

Fortunately, the US Center for Disease Control (CDC) has released guidelines with information on handling infected, or potentially infected, cases at your funeral home, crematory, prep room, etc. These preventative measures align with current best practices in the prep room or crematory (i.e. wear universal PPE, limit exposure to the disease, and clean all surfaces carefully) that protect you from everything from the common cold to tuberculosis.

Current estimates suggest that more than 220,000 people will die from COVID-19 in the US by November. But your cases are not the only potential source of infection in your businesses. Of those that contract COVID-19, 80% are estimated to be mild which means they are more likely to transmit the disease. Experts are warning that rest of 2020 will be difficult depending on our response, and likely to continue until there is a readily available and adopted vaccine.

With state and local governments setting the current restrictions and guidance, current and accurate information is important to track. Consider designating one staff member in your office as point person to monitor reports and updates from the CDC and your local jurisdictions, at least daily, to make sure your business is operating with the best information. As this post is updated, newest content will appear in gold to highlight latest information.

So what do you need to know to prepare your business when an outbreak hits?

Make a Business Plan

Since "workers performing mortuary services, including funeral homes, crematoriums, and cemetery workers" have been officially listed as Essential Critical Infrastructure Workers, it is even more important to make sure your business is prepared for this challenge. Inform, educate, and train your staff of the CDC recommendations.

Now that this post is getting so long, we've added a Table of Contents linking to information below:

  1. Caring for the Deceased
  2. Operating the Crematory
  3. Business Support
  4. Serving the Living
  5. Managing Staff
  6. Directing the Funeral
  7. Supplies

As a reminder, if there are federal and local orders/laws in conflict, follow the most restrictive to ensure that you comply with both, and ask for additional guidance and support as needed. Some resources to consider are: your state governor, local mayor, local health agency, as well as the Disaster Mortuary Operational Response Teams (D-MORT), Emergency Management Agencies (EMA) or Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) plus the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) and the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO). Be sure to check with health and government authorities any time you have questions to ensure safety and compliance for you, your staff, and your business. If you are designated an essential worker in an area under an enforced lockdown, consider carrying staff identification, state professional license, or some other information that demonstrates your status for ease of movement.

Caring for the Deceased

For any staff who handle the dead, the National Association of Funeral Directors (NFDA) and the Funeral Service Association of Canada (FSAC/ASFC) have useful resources for embalming, prep room, and removal staff in accordance with CDC guidelines (including specific guidelines for funeral homes) which clearly state recommendations for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), transporting the deceased, and cleaning surfaces. Many authorities believe that cases and deaths are under-reported, so anyone coming in contact with the deceased should operate assuming that the case is positive.

In the case of embalming, funeral homes are encouraged to follow families wishes assuming that the firm and embalmer have access to PPE and the time to embalm safely. Remember, as important as it is to wear PPE when handling the deceased, it is also important to follow the recommended sequence for putting on and removing the equipment.

Cremation is a sure way to destroy any contagion on a deceased body, which is why it's preferred for Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and Ebola, but the WHO has stated that "people who have died from COVID-19 can be buried or cremated. Confirm national and local requirements that may dictate the handling and disposition of the remains." The CDC has not released definitive information on how long the coronavirus lives in a deceased body, but they do say that "there is currently no known risk associated with being in the same room at a funeral or visitation service with the body of someone who died of COVID-19." As always, families should do what's right for them, which can include caring for the deceased themselves. They can have funerals and burials as long as they follow their state and local mandates regarding the number of people and social distancing guidelines.

^toc

Operating the Crematory

Most guidelines that have been released do not specifically mention the crematory or operator. The following assumes that the crematory operator does not come into direct contact with the deceased, rather handles the container. If the operator in your business handles the deceased, see above.

CANA recommends the following:

  • accept only cases in leak-proof, sturdy cremation containers per CANA Crematory Operations best practices
  • the use of Standard Precautions should ensure safest possible work conditions. This includes PPE, as mentioned above, which is in short supply so follow optimize your use per CDC guidelines.
  • clean all shared tools, equipment, and surfaces frequently - e.g. the cremation container, door or loader, refrigerator, door handles and light switches
  • maintain social distancing between co-workers and other people who may enter the crematory
  • Limit witnessed cremations to ten or fewer people total, including the funeral director and operator or other staff present.

Generally, viruses are killed above 200 degrees Fahrenheit, so the cremation process kills the coronavirus. There is no concern about virus exiting the building via emissions through the stack or remaining in cremated remains, however the operator should wear PPE to ensure transmission from operator to urn does not occur.

When releasing cremated remains to the family, limit the size of groups to ten or fewer, but also consider bringing the urn and paperwork to the client waiting in the car. Try to minimize physical paperwork with electronic documents and signatures, or providing gloves, to cut back on touching paper. Similarly, keeping clearly marked sanitized and used pens to take and return for cleaning will cut back on multiple use.

In this pandemic situation, some crematories are concerned about regulations which limit the cremations a business can perform. CANA is supporting state associations who are working with these regulators to address these permits in the hardest hit areas.

^toc

Business Support

With the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA), passed March 18 and effective April 1 through December 31, 2020, businesses have new requirements for managing staff. All employers with 500 or fewer employees must provide paid Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) leave and paid sick leave – this is new for those who manage companies with fewer than 50 employees who were previously exempt from such requirements. The Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division has required posters and useful information to communicate with your staff.

As an employer who was previously exempt, this could be overwhelming, so it’s important to open lines of communication with your staff and establish a clear chain of command to address rapidly developing information. Don’t assume that all staff will immediately take advantage of these benefits and leave the business in a time of crises. Provide guidance and support in addition to addressing their concerns about what to do if they or a family member get sick. Don’t be afraid of questions or to admit that you don’t know. Importantly, communicate often to make sure staff are okay and keep lines of communication open.

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, passed March 27 and retroactively effective to February 15, 2020, offers financial assistance to small businesses and large corporations alike. The US Senate Committee on Small Business & Entrepreneurship has provided the Small Business Owner’s Guide to the CARES Act resource. If your business is having financial difficulty, you can apply for relief through the Payment Protection Program (PPP) with the US Small Business Administration (SBA) and your current bank. Alternately, you can seek support from the Employee Retention Credit (ERC), however a business cannot receive both the PPP and the ERC.

To better understand how both resources effect your business, CANA recommends contacting services who manage and administer your payroll, business insurance, health insurance, preneed providers, and bank. These are groups carefully monitoring how these regulations and opportunities impact your work in your area, and know your business best.

For those in need of extra staff support, state associations in hard-hit areas and the NFDA have organized volunteer programs to help. Reach out to these associations with your need or availability.

^toc

Serving the Living

But don’t forget that the living are actually your primary audience, and the ones your staff come into contact with every day. The CDC has special recommendations for the workplace in “Guidance for Businesses and Workplaces to Plan, Prepare, and Respond.”

Many of the roles at a funeral home, like funeral directors, embalmers, crematory operators, don’t do the kind of jobs that let you work from home. We cannot access the prep room from our living room, or arrange with families from our beds. So encouraging proactive measures to keep employees well, then being flexible when people are ill, is key to keeping your staff and the community safe in any outbreak.

By now, everyone knows the top four guidelines on personal safety:

  1. Wash your hands often, for at least 20 seconds.
    Are you sick of singing the A, B, C’s while washing your hands? The good news is some other popular songs have 20-second choruses, including Landslide by Fleetwood Mac, Raspberry Beret by Prince, Jolene by Dolly Parton, Fever by Peggy Lee, Africa by Toto, Mr. Brightside by The Killers, and Truth Hurts by Lizzo. Mix it up and keep scrubbing.
  2. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, mouth, and ears.
  3. Cough and sneeze into a disposable tissue and discard it.
  4. Maintain at least six-feet (2-metres) around others, particularly sick persons.

When making arrangements or directing a funeral, these measures are important. The CDC now recommends, and many states mandate, "covering your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others." Of course, the most vulnerable populations are typically older generations and those with pre-existing conditions (including smokers). If a staff member is concerned that they have been exposed, the CDC has issued guidelines for Safety Practices for Critical Workers which include frequent temperature readings, mask wearing, and frequent disinfecting of work spaces. The CDC and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have released joint guidance on appropriate disinfectants and cleaners. Shared work spaces include break rooms, vehicles, and any shared equipment. The CDC has developed a toolkit with language and posters you can use to communicate with your staff.

And don't forget your four-legged co-workers. Some animals have tested positive for the coronavirus, though it's unclear whether the virus can spread from pets to humans. To protect your pets, service animals, and your community, the CDC recommends limiting their interactions as well.

^toc

Managing Staff

In the event that someone does get sick, encourage them to stay home. This is a difficult argument to make with the existing workforce shortage on top of a potentially growing caseload, because these jobs rely on you being in person to serve your families. But with the COVID-19 pandemics, you cannot serve your community while being sick yourself. Sick employees need to stay home to recuperate and be well, but also to prevent the spread of disease in the community. As the disease continues to spread, you may encounter employee shortages from illness, school closures, and caring for loved ones. Your business must have a plan for what you will do if you have too few staff.

Death Care Services are deemed as a low risk sector, and typically exempt from reporting to OSHA, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), or state agency incidents of illness, however CANA Member Regulatory Support Services recommends making a record of all work-related illnesses and injuries and placing that record in the affected employee’s file. For confirmed cases of COVID-19 or an employee that shows symptoms of COVID-19, this would include the employer’s directive to an ill employee that he or she does not return to work until cleared to do so by health care professional.

The challenge with COVID-19, or any infectious disease for that matter, is knowing with absolute certainty that an illness is a result of exposure in the workplace. Especially with the high communicability of the coronavirus, sources of exposure outside the workplace must be considered when assessing whether to report any fatality or hospitalization of an employee as a result of contracting COVID-19. However, some states are presuming that any essential worker who contracts the disease to have become infected at work thus making them eligible for worker compensation. Check your state's department of labor for any specific requirements.

^toc

Directing the Funeral

And don’t forget that you also host community events and services with their own considerations. The CDC has special, updated guidelines for “Mass Gatherings or Large Community Events” to help you plan and host safe services. Primarily, they recommend having posters and signs in addition to supplies on hand to keep everyone healthy, namely hand sanitizer, soap, tissues, and face coverings. Keep surfaces like door handles and light switches clean, and remember to talk to your community volunteers about being safe, too. The CDC even has a toolkit with posters and language you can use to communicate safe practices to your attendees.

With increasing emphasis on mitigating the spread of COVID-19, in areas with active outbreaks, the CDC recommends community-based interventions including "event cancellations, social distancing, and creating employee plans to work remotely," careful planning and communications with your families is important. Social distancing, in particular, runs counter to the spirit of the funeral by discouraging gatherings of more than 10 people, encouraging vulnerable populations to stay away, and avoiding direct contact with others. Fortunately, you are professionals trained in talking to families with compassion and understanding. For ideas on making your communications meaningful, watch a free, on-demand webinar from Lacy Robinson with "Practical Ways to Serve Families During COVID-19."

Now that federal guidelines from the White House have sunset, state governors' and state and local health authorities are determining how businesses and communities can operate — you can find this list of resources above. In some areas, any visitation or service has been prohibited. White House guidelines to reopen businesses and services is recommended in multiple phases to keep employees healthy, prevent spread, and moderate hospital cases and is helping states set their own reopening procedures. These recommendations will require your business to develop plans and policies to accommodate your families' preference for service while maintaining the health of your community.

Guidance from the CDC for consumers is written to help you educate your families on ways to hold services safely and the importance of taking social distance guidelines safely. Ceremony expert Glenda Stansbury provided a free resource to help you and your families find creative solutions, such as livestreamed services, to protect your business and the communities you serve. Grief expert Dr. Alan Wolfelt shared his suggestions on holding some form of ceremony at the Center for Loss blog.

Develop a plan with recommendations from the CDC including how to communicate with relevant parties. Mostly, be in touch with state and community partners to help respond to changing needs of your community. Working together facilitates communications, response planning, and organizing when the need arises. The Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) has a list of who to contact at the state-level and the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) is a good resource for local-level needs. These are great new additions to your connections with first responders, hospices, and other community leaders.

^toc

Keep Supplies Stocked

PPE and other safety materials have been difficult to source, so it’s a good idea to take stock of the goods you use frequently and make sure you have supplies. For those that are concerned about PPE supplies, the CDC has recommendations for Optimizing the Supply of PPE and and OSHA has issued interim guidance which brings their enforcement more in line with CDC recommendations.

The CDC has also provided a PPE Burn Rate Calculator to help facilities to plan and optimize the use of PPE. Also, reach out to suppliers, even those outside of mortuary supply, if your need is severe. As a final resort, reach out to your local health authority, coroner, or medical examiner to explain your need and ask for recommendations. One CANA Member suggested ordering smaller quantities to prevent large orders being flagged and redirected.

CANA Member Bass-Mollett shared their hard work finding the answer on how to request N95 masks as it was explained to John Flowers, CEO of Bass-Mollett:

  1. All N95s in existing stock and those being manufactured now are sent to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
  2. FEMA allocates supplies to each state’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC) based on need
  3. Each EOC manages requests from entities within its respective state — including death care professionals
  4. To place a request for N95s, you’ll need to contact your state’s EOC.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has issued recommended Guidance for Extended Use and Limited Reuse of N95 Filtering Facepiece Respirators which suggests that equipment be alternated and discarded when damaged or dirtied. Some recommendations suggest to avoid wearing cosmetics, which could dirty the mask and reduce its effectiveness faster.

^toc

Keep Calm and Wash Your Hands

Situations like this, in times of increased caseloads and illness, require flexibility, patience and planning which is why you need to have these discussions and plans now. Like the radiation case study in 2019, we want to help you plan, be safe, and prevent panic and misinformation. As information continues to change rapidly, the best resource for the most current information on your business operations is your local government and health authority.

Predictions say that "prolonged or intermittent social distancing may be necessary into 2022." Preparing now for the virus's resurgence in the Fall and Winter means you can protect yourself and your business with proactive plans and preventative measures.

Situations like this also require extra care for yourself and your colleagues. "Stress prevention and management is critical for responders to stay well and to continue to help in the situation." Use the support resources from the CDC available by both call and text, and work together to stay healthy. Jason Troyer, PhD., specializes in helping death care professionals serve their families better. He wrote a post for us about taking care of yourself in these ever-changing times. Additional resources unique to death care are available in his Finding Resilience program.

Thank you for the work you do.

^toc

Resources

For the next few months, CANA Members are invited to join us for monthly Open Forums to discuss how they're handling their response to COVID-19 and supporting their community. Check your inbox for instructions to join, or contact Membership Manager Brie Bingham for more information.

US Center for Disease Control (CDC)
US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

Additional Resources

 


Barbara Kemmis

Barbara Kemmis is Executive Director of the Cremation Association of North America.

Tags:  business planning  events  processes and procedures  services 

Share |
Permalink
 

Keeping The Next Generation Engaged and Motivated at Your Funeral Home/Cemetery

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, February 5, 2020
Updated: Monday, February 3, 2020
Keeping The Next Generation Engaged and Motivated at Your Funeral Home/Cemetery

 

In 2020, maintaining and keeping good quality talent on your team isn’t just a want, it’s an absolute need. It’s what’s going to determine your success and the foundation of your business moving into this next decade.

This next generation needs a purpose, something that fires them up and gets them out of bed in the morning. Yes, millennials want to make a living, but they want to make a meaningful living. According to Forbes, millennials ranked meaningful work as one of the top needs they have from their workplace.

The Harsh Reality

“People don’t leave bad companies, they leave bad managers.”

If leaders and those in positions of power can take this quote by Marcus Buckingham to heart, I believe we would see so much more retention amongst our profession.

Here are some harsh realities:

These are some powerful statistics that mean if we aren’t encouraging a culture of growth, this next generation has no problem going to find it elsewhere.

Employee Engagement

How connected do you think your employees are to your company? If we are being honest with ourselves, there are plenty of areas we can improve in this category.

According to a study done by Gallup in 2017, 230,000 employees were surveyed in 142 countries on their current engagement. Employees fall into one of three categories:

  1. Engaged
  2. Not Engaged
  3. Actively Disengaged

Only 13% of employees they surveyed were truly passionate and motivated by the work they did every day. An astounding 63% were not engaged, and 24% were actively disengaged.

The impact of a disengaged employee can negatively impact your business in the following ways:

  • They’ll be cutting corners, which results in poor decision making
  • There will be no drive and no focus, which results in less creativity
  • They simply don’t care, which results in negative customer reviews
  • Less productivity requires more staff, which results in over-hiring with a lower ROI.

Unfortunately, there isn’t much we can do about the actively disengaged. They just need a path out. However, the statistics show that around 63% have the potential to be engaged if we put the effort in to putting meaning behind what they are doing.

What category would you put most of your employees in? Do they fall into the popular category not engaged? Maybe it’s time to rethink how you’re motivating your employees. Do you share a common purpose that they can buy into with passion? How often do you give praise? Could it be time to put more incentive compensation plans in place? Purpose and incentive are the keys to motivating engagement.

Once we have worked to get our employees into the “engaged” category, the positive benefits have an astounding impact. Statistics show that 50% will post messages on social media and 24% are more likely to help boost sales than disengaged employees. Find ways to bring meaning back so that your employees live in the engaged category, and your firm is guaranteed to reap the benefits.

Create Your Plan

Hire the Right People

Obviously, all this talk about having engaged employees is only possible if we hire the right people from the get-go that are naturally motivated. Service attitude is a big thing we look for at JCG. Recognize if they have the natural ability to go above and beyond to exceed a customer’s expectations. Are they good listeners, do they care, are they genuinely interested in other people and have a desire to always be learning? You can teach service aptitude (the ability recognize service opportunities), but you can’t teach attitude (the desire to serve).

Onboarding and Training

Develop a welcome program that makes them remember their first day. Decorate their desk with a welcome sign, write an internal spotlight, or take them to lunch with your team. Remember, their first day of work is one way to set the tone for their engagement. Spend a lot of effort on helping them to understand WHY you do what you do and how they bring value to that purpose. The first few weeks are critical to employee engagement. The more they buy in early, the more likely they are to want to stick around.

Initial training an on-going training is essential to employee engagement. You must teach them skills to be successful. Have a minimum standard for customer service expectations in writing and don’t train just once. Reinforce the expectations as often as weekly. This includes modeling, observing, and measuring behavior.

Retention and Relationships

Employees are more engaged when they are recognized, so communicate! Provide for feedback, and even ask for feedback yourself. Peer recognition is another way to keep employees engaged. Set up a quarterly award that gets everyone involved to recognize their peers. Feedback is the key, as this next generation craves it.

So where should we start? A good place to assess where your engagement is at is to survey your staff about their happiness at work. Ask about if they feel valued, and if they appreciate the kind of feedback they get.

It might be a rude awakening, but we all have to start somewhere. Getting the data is the only way you can grow from today into reaping the benefits of having engaged employees long into the future.

 


Developing a Collaborative Growth Culture with Lori SalbergWant to learn more about increase employee engagement and improve customer service? Join Lori Salberg and more cremation rockstars in Las Vegas for CANA’s 2020 Cremation Symposium, February 26-28. Lori will present on “Developing a Collaborative Growth Culture” to re-invigorate organizations by fully engaging employees, improving performance of the business overall.

See what else we have planned and register for CANA's 2020 Cremation Symposium: goCANA.org/CGT



Lori Salberg

Lori Salberg, Director of J3Tech Solutions a Division of Johnson Consulting Group, joined Johnson Consulting Group in 2017, bringing experience in cemetery, funeral home, and pre-need sales management. Along with sales and operations management, Lori directed the development of two propriety cemetery and funeral home enterprise software systems.

Lori began her career in 2001 as a Family Service Counselor for the Catholic Cemeteries in San Jose. She quickly moved into management and rose to Associate Director of three cemetery locations. In 2010, Lori furthered her career as General Manager of Holy Sepulchre Cemetery and Holy Angels Funeral and Cremation Center in Hayward, CA, where she also joined the Catholic Management Services leadership team. As Director of Administration and IT, Lori brought management expertise and software solutions to cemetery and funeral home clients. In 2015, Lori joined PlotBox as VP of Sales. Lori contributed to the development of a SaaS cemetery software program, and was principally responsible for introducing it to the US market.

She is a frequent speaker at many state and regional industry events and an article contributor to many industry magazines. She is also a member of the ICCFA Sales and Marketing Committee, which plans and oversees the Annual World Wide Sales Conference each January. Lori balances her passion for helping clients prepare for the future with raising her three children, Catalina, JJ, and Lyla. She spends a lot of weekends at dance competitions and little league baseball tournaments.

Tags:  business planning  hr  leadership  professional development 

Share |
Permalink
 

The Unasked Question, The Unwanted Answers

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, January 22, 2020
Updated: Thursday, January 2, 2020
The Unasked Question, The Unwanted Answers

 

“How long will my burial business last?”

As I was writing this article, our eight-year-old grandson shed some light on the responses from – well an eight-year-old point of view. My wife, a former teacher, was helping him with his homework – a fair amount of math work and then onto the dreaded reading. Our grandson, who was about at his concentration limit for the moment, started playing a video game.

When his grandmother mentioned reading a bit, his reply was surprising and unexpected. His delivery was neither harsh nor snippy. He merely said, “Maybe after this game or when I am dead.” In other words, my wife asked the question he did not want to hear and we got the answer that grandparents don’t want in return. Still, we found it quite funny, exactly framing his “not now” attitude. Discussions on changing consumer attitudes and funeral home finances today often elicit a similar response – not now.

If not now, when?

Earlier this year, a funeral home owner asked me, “How long will my burial business last?” On the surface some might scoff at such a question – too simplistic, too old school. I beg to differ. Looking at this question offers us an insight into the core revenue of a funeral home. The issue also allows me to re-address a topic I first covered several years ago.

Ten years ago, a funeral home owner asking a question on “how long a burial business will last” would have delighted me! To hear it today is a bit disheartening yet shows that owners are finally thinking about the impact of cremation. After all the forewarnings from myself and others, funeral home owners finally now feel the revenue effects. Neither I nor others take delight in the ‘sudden realization’, but we fully understand the dilemma that you face.

What to do?

If you are a funeral home owner close to retirement, maybe the answer is to find a willing buyer. In our valuation work, we find that top-performing firms obtain the highest values. Top performers attract skilled staff and maintain their facilities meticulously. If your firm is not a top performer, you may want to change your management style.

Many funeral home owners are not ready to retire. Funeral service may still be calling - kudos to you. What is the best course of action for those closely held to funeral service? There are a number of points to consider.

Remodeling

To be clear, I am not referring to remodeling the facilities (although that could be an issue too). In this case remodeling refers to remodeling the core business - a new business model, a business model based on the financial realities of a different revenue stream, probably with less revenue per call than in the past.

Staffing

Much has been written about the current high employment rate and the difficulty in finding employees. Funeral service has its own challenges, which I hear about weekly – “There are no quality, qualified licensed funeral directors to be found.” Outside analysts agree that we are experiencing a shortage of trained personnel in funeral service and will for a number of years.

Outside of raiding other funeral homes, attracting top-notch people to funeral service is one solution. Regulations need to change by accommodating quality personnel who may not want an embalmer’s license.

Ownership Shifts

A recent rush in acquisitions foretells the shift in funeral home ownership. Sixty-year-old-plus owners now face their own exit. Some are well prepared, but some are not. The consolidation of competitors began a few years ago and will continue for several years. This consolidation of owners, and perhaps rooftops, bodes well for the younger generation of owners. My 2015 estimate of 25% too many funeral homes in the U.S. needs to be updated, but I suspect that number has grown. Taking calls from declining firms or making prudent acquisitions ensures their success. However, successful owners must capture consumer needs today.

Consumers’ Needs

Easier said than done, understanding consumers takes on critical importance. Without relying on casket and vault sales as the main revenue-driver, new-age owners will allow consumers to express their grief in new ways – ways driven more by consumers right now, than orchestrated solely by what was done in the past.

Owners refusing to embrace the new consumer-driven business model can count their days by how many caskets they sell. If you did not watch the August 14, 2019 HBO special, Alternate Endings, find a way to view the show. The story of six endings contained several emotional departures from funeral service, but the biggest takeaway? While there may have been licensed funeral directors in the back stories, no funeral director took a vital role in these non-”traditional” funerals.

The 2019 NFDA Consumer Survey found that 53% of those surveyed indicated that they could do their own funeral or memorial service, without a funeral director. Thankfully many client-families still want or need a funeral director but the HBO special and the NFDA survey point to what could be a rising number of people who don’t see a need to use you. How can we attract more interest in ceremonies recognizing a life lived?

Imagination Gone Wild

For nearly a century, funeral service hid behind the casket and vault sale. The loss of casket and outer burial container sales clearly reduces revenue. We must focus more on the personal side, making solid connections with consumers – no more just glad-handing family members as they come in the door – because, they may not come in the door. We must give them a reason that “remembering a loved one” is important.

The move from merchandise-oriented to a service-oriented funeral business began many years ago in higher cremation areas. Now, the cremation upturn is hitting even the rural and largely unaffected areas.

In a recent AARP magazine interview, musician Carlos Santana commented, “You stay relevant by trusting you have something people need.” Funeral business needs to specialize in service now or risk irrelevance.

As the HBO special revealed, some consumers want a personal hand in a memorial (or living funeral). We have to help them truly capture the essence of their loved one. Making each funeral/memorial service special is the future of funeral service in my opinion.

Success in the 2020s

Themed good-byes represent one logical solution. Yes, they may take a lot more work than the old burial model, but they usually contain the “wow” factor for many consumers. Celebrants or celebrant-like ceremonies seem to make more connections as well. Look for off-menu choices that resonate with client-families. Let your imagination run wild and something magical may just happen. Success in the 2020s will be measured by story-telling, creating a compelling story about a loved one, a story even an eight-year-old can appreciate. Master-storytellers will excel.

Our eight-year-old grandson was finally persuaded to read that book he discarded. He actually found it thought-provoking. It was a small history book from nearly 100 years ago. Things have changed dramatically since then — many advancements but many old beliefs dispelled.

Losing 1.65 burial calls per 100 cases annually to cremation or $66,000+ over the next 10 years is not welcome news. Our 500-call funeral home owner exhibited the courage to ask the tough question. I hope he is ready for the answers. Are you?

 


This post is excerpted from the full article “How Long Will My Burial Business Last?” originally published In Volume 16, Issue 3 of Directions by Nixon Consulting, Inc. This newsletter content and information is sent to clients and associates of Nixon Consulting, Inc. Published quarterly. Subscription is by Invitation only from NCi. Reproduced with permission of the author.



David Nixon

David Nixon began working with funeral home owners in 1979. David is a Certified Management Consultant™ (CMC®), accredited by the Institute of Management Consultants, USA. David is noted for his ‘Listening to Cremation’ annual cremation study, which was first published in 1995. In addition to his work on funeral home financial analysis, he also concentrates on strategic planning, FTC Funeral Rule Compliance, funeral home budgeting and pricing, as well as funeral business valuations. David also focuses on exit planning and the transition of funeral home owners with all the complexities involved in selling or buying a funeral home.

Tags:  business planning  hr 

Share |
Permalink
 
Page 1 of 2
1  |  2